Specialties

McKenzie Technique

What is the McKenzie Method of MDT?

The McKenzie Method of MDT is a reliable assessment process intended for all musculoskeletal problems, including pain in the back, neck and extremities (i.e., shoulder, knee, ankle etc.), as well as issues associated with sciatica, sacroiliac joint pain, arthritis, degenerative disc disease, muscle spasms and intermittent numbness in hands or feet. If you are suffering from any such issues, then a MDT assessment may be right for you!

Developed by world-renowned expert physiotherapist Robin McKenzie in the 1950s, this well-researched, exercise based approach of assessment, diagnosis and treatment uses a comprehensive and clinically reasoned evaluation of patients without the use of expensive diagnostic imaging (e.g. x-rays and MRIs). The treatment principles of the McKenzie Method promote the body's potential to repair itself and do not involve the use of medication, heat, cold, ultrasound, needles, or surgery. McKenzie allows patients to learn the principles and empowers them to be in control of their own symptom management, which can reduce dependency on medical intervention.

If utilized correctly, the achievable goals of the McKenzie Method in a cost- and time-effective manner are to:

How does it work?

MDT is comprised of four primary steps: assessment, classification, treatment and prevention.

Most musculoskeletal pain is "mechanical" in origin, which means it is not due to a serious pathology like cancer or infection but a result of abnormal or unusual forces or mechanics occurring in the tissue. Further, it means that a position, movement or activity caused the pain to start. If a mechanical force caused the problem then it is logical that a mechanical force may be part of the solution. The MDT system is designed to identify the mechanical problem and develop a plan to correct or improve the mechanics and thus decrease or eliminate the pain and functional problems.

In the simplest and most common instance, this may mean that moving in one direction may provoke and worsen the pain, and moving in the opposite direction may eliminate the pain and restore function. This is known as Directional Preference. Other patients may have pain just at the end of movement or with certain functional movements like throwing or stair climbing. The McKenzie assessment explores these different positions and movements, how the patient performs them, and the response to these movements. Interpreting this information, the clinician determines which of the movements and posture becomes the treatment as well as the necessary exercise dosage.

Click here to find out more the on the McKenzie Institute website.

Vestibular/Concussion Rehabilitation

Titleist Performance Institute

Since the late 1990’s, the game of golf has seen a seismic shift in how player’s at the highest level prepare and maintain their bodies for competition. Player’s are more powerful, more athletic and better equipped at an earlier age to perform at the highest levels while older players are extending their careers at incredibly high performance levels.

The game has reached a point where its participants do not need convincing that better fitness, biomechanics and health will improve their chances of playing their best. Today’s golfers need to be convinced that their instructors are up to date with the latest information on the sport.

Golfers want to trust their coach, instructor or practitioner. TPI Certification gives golfers that trust!

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Experts

TMJ/TMD

We can help restore the natural movement of your jaw and decrease your pain.

Treatments include:

Posture education. If your therapist finds that you sit with your head in an increased forward position, this means that you are placing greater strain on the muscles beneath your chin, causing the lower jaw to pull back and the mouth to be in an open position even when resting, and increasing stress on the TMJ. You also might be overworking the jaw muscles to force the jaw closed so your mouth isn't open all the time. Your therapist will teach you to be aware of your posture so that you can improve the resting position of your jaw, head, neck, breastbone, and shoulder blades.

Improve jaw movement. Physical therapists use skilled hand movements called manual therapy to increase movement and relieve pain in tissues and joints. Your therapist also might use manual therapy to stretch the jaw in order to restore normal joint and muscle flexibility or break up scar tissues that sometimes develop.

Special pain treatments. In addition to manual therapy, if your pain is severe, your physical therapist may decide to use treatments such as electrical stimulation or ultrasound to reduce pain.

If your TMD is caused by teeth alignment problems, your physical therapist can refer you to a dentist who specializes in TMD who can correct your teeth alignment with special appliances, such as "bit guards," that create a natural resting position of the jaw to relax the TMJ, relieve pain, and improve jaw function.

Athletic Training

Athletic training encompasses the prevention, examination, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of emergent, acute or chronic injuries and medical conditions. Athletic training is recognized by the American Medical Association (AMA), Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as an allied health care profession. Click here to learn more.

Strength and Conditioning Specialist

Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists (CSCSs) are professionals who apply scientific knowledge to train athletes for the primary goal of improving athletic performance. They conduct sport-specific testing sessions, design and implement safe and effective strength training and conditioning programs and provide guidance regarding nutrition and injury prevention. Recognizing that their area of expertise is separate and distinct, CSCSs consult with and refer athletes to other professionals when appropriate. Click here to learn more.